USA | CultureReady

What are DoD Regional Centers?

The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) is the executive agent for several regional centers which offer courses, seminars, workshops, research and dynamic outreach among U.S. and foreign military, civilian, and non-government actors. These regional centers include:

 

Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) (Honolulu, HI)

Military Culture and the Transition to Civilian Life: Suicide Risk and Other Considerations

Suicide among active duty military members and veterans has increased in the wake of the two international conflicts, surpassing those of the general population for the first time since Vietnam. Recent research has identified the period of separation from the military as a period of elevated risk, regardless of deployment history.

ROTC Students Study Abroad

In this CNN interview with Veteran Army interrogator, Charlie Mink, “Project GO” is discussed. Project Global Officer (Project GO) is a collaborative initiative that promotes critical language education, study abroad, and intercultural dialogue opportunities for Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) students.

Project GO programs focus on the languages and countries of the Middle East, Asia, Central Asia, Africa, and South America.

 

 

Understanding Reverse Culture Shock

Reverse culture shock is a common reaction to returning home from time abroad. It is an emotional and psychological stage of re-adjustment, similar to your initial adjustment to living abroad. Symptoms can range from feeling like no one understands you or how you’ve changed to feeling panicked that you will lose part of your identity if you don’t have an outlet to pursue new interests that were sparked abroad. Your reactions to re-entry may vary, but common signs are:

Linguistic Differences Around the U.S.

It’s easy to assume that cultures correspond to countries, but the reality is much more complex, and the same is true for languages. You probably know, for instance, that Spanish is spoken in dozens of countries around the world, and that it is spoken a bit differently in each. But what you may not realize is that cultural and linguistic differences occur on a much more local level as well.

Cultural Differences Around the U.S.

About twelve years ago, a friend yelled at me for what he saw as constant interruptions. “You never let me finish talking,” he said.

I was confused. When had I ever interrupted him?

After much discussion, I finally figured it out. What he considered an interruption — saying “right” or “yes” while he was talking — was the only way I knew to listen politely. In my experience, remaining completely silent while someone else was speaking meant you were checked out.

The Journal of Culture, Language and International Security (ISCL)

Volume 2, Issue 1 brings together another set of talented individuals from myriad backgrounds and positions under the topic of Clash of Cultures.  

To Download a PDF of this issue Click HERE

Contributors: Lee Johnson, David L. Edwards, Aimee Vieira, Sam Almesfer, Captain Caleb P. Slayton, Catherine Ingold, David Ellis, Robert R. Green Sands

Contents:

Pages